ICAA Launches its “Rebranding Aging” Campaign

Rebranding Aging FAQs

What is the purpose of the Rebranding Aging campaign?

The goal is to inform the media, marketers, families and individuals about the untapped human potential associated with aging. Tapping into this potential could help us maximize the opportunities while reducing the challenges and minimizing the impact associated with an aging society. The overarching aim of fostering this knowledge and recognition is to change society’s stereotypical perceptions of aging.

Why “rebranding”?

“Rebranding” is a word that resonates with marketers and the media. These professions, like many others, have been slow to respond to the needs, dreams, desires, capabilities and expectations of burgeoning numbers of older people. In fact, the majority of adults over age 55 feel that advertising does not reflect their current lifestyle, and they’re turned off by marketing messages that target them. Instead of encouraging them to make the most of a longer life expectancy, society often discourages older adults from pursuing new, meaningful endeavors.

As it stands now, older people are told (and therefore tell themselves) on a regular basis that they’re too old to engage in many life-affirming activities that contribute to society, such as working or going back to work if they wish; gaining new knowledge; learning new activities; and being physically active. Despite having years of job experience, they are not valued by the companies they work for; despite having high disposable incomes in many cases, they are not perceived as valuable to marketers.

By changing views and expectations of aging, it is our view that society will not only manage population aging better, but also promote a new vision of aging. In that sense, we are not just launching a campaign; we are creating a movement.

What are the components of this movement?

The Rebranding Aging movement is multipronged, focusing on the media, marketers, older adults, and young people. Our objectives, and the steps we’ll take to realize them, are as follows:

Media and marketers objective: Change perceptions of aging

  • Identify, create and share communications guidelines that more effectively reach people 50 years and older. The guidelines will encourage the media and marketers to provide a more realistic and complete picture of what it means to become and be old in North America.
  • Create a clearinghouse for best practices, guidelines, resources, images and references for use by the media and industry.
  • Create an ongoing public relations campaign that will highlight the untapped human potential of an aging population and the opportunity it represents for society.
  • Show business leaders, associations and organizations that many older adults are living full lives, not just focusing on challenges. This reality has significant implications for the types of products and services that can and should be marketed to this population.

Older-adult objectives: Change expectations, increase societal participation

  • ICAA and partners will select a team of ICAA Champions from among their customers and staff who can take on the roles of educators and role models in local communities.
  • These individuals will visit community-based organizations to educate and inform their customers about how rethinking the way we age can help everyone age better.
  • One of the ICAA Champions deliverables will be charging individuals to earn their Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA). ICAA Champions will also participate in support of First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move! initiative,” which provides opportunities for intergenerational events that build relationships between youth and older people. For more information on the PALA, please visit: www.millionpalachallenge.org.
  • ICAA will create an information portal to support the outreach needs of ICAA Champions, which will include resources such as campaign how-to-guides and PowerPoint presentations and posters.

Youth objective: Add new meaning to “old school cool”

  • One of the ICAA Champions deliverables will be charging individuals to earn their Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA). ICAA Champions will also participate in support of First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move! initiative,” which provides opportunities for intergenerational events that build relationships between youth and older people. For more information on the PALA, please visit: www.millionpalachallenge.org.
  • This initiative will give ICAA Champions and partners the opportunity to encourage more positive expectations of aging among youth through exposure to positive role models.

Colin Milner, founder and CEO of ICAA

How can I get involved?

ICAA has several levels of involvement. If your organization is interested in becoming a Rebranding Aging partner, or you would like to learn more about Rebranding Aging, please email Colin Milner, or call toll-free 866-335-9777 or 604-734-4466. If you are interested in volunteering as an ICAA Champion, please email: champions@icaa.cc.

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3 Responses to ICAA Launches its “Rebranding Aging” Campaign

  1. I’ve just been told by a long time friend of mine, Randy Eady, that he’s been chosen
    as a champion.

    I’m 51, just joined the AARP &, thanks to an article by Randy, in a recent issue of the IACC Journal, discovered their website, and interesting magazine.

    Thanks for posting this interesting FAQ!

  2. Randy Eady says:

    As a current ICAA Member and Tai Chi/Movement and Balance instructor at the ACTs Continuing Care Retirement Communities referenced in this timely USA Today Article:
    http://yourlife.usatoday.com/fitness-food/exercise/story/2011/05/Seniors-exercise-right-to-a-better-more-youthful-life/46989046/1

    I heartily concur with the statement made in the article by Marco Pahor, head of the aging institute at the University of Florida (and agree on the need for Champions to expand engagement possibilities/opportunities):

    Pahor notes as a lead-in to the study U of F is doing with seven other universities called Lifestudy:

    “There is an epidemic of sedentary lifestyle and obesity in this country,” he says, “and a second epidemic of an aging nation. Studies show the chance of someone 65 or older ending up in a nursing home is about 50%.”

    Lifestudy is based on a pilot program that showed those who were guided by instructors on moderate physical-activity plans did better than those who got doctors’ advice alone.

    It involves 1,600 participants in a study comparing a moderate-intensity physical-activity program with a healthy-aging education program to determine what might be effective in preventing frailty.

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